Hats, hats, hats.

Dec 23, 2019


One thing most farmers have no shortage of is hats. I’ve heard a lot of stories over the years about over running closets full of hats from various farmers vying for a farmer’s business. The irony of this is that farmers truly do have to wear several different “hats” in order to run a successful operation. Farming today involves big money.  It’s not at all uncommon for today’s farming ventures to have gross sales into the millions of dollars.  One of the most important hats farmers wear is CEO.  Most farmers I know would never apply for a traditional business executive job, but that’s exactly what they are.  Add to that: marketer, equipment manager, mechanic, secretary, truck driver, human resources manager, etc.  The weight of all this can get very heavy at times.  I’ve seen it happen more than once.  However, some of the most successful, best run, and least stressed operations I’ve worked around do a good job of creating a team atmosphere where different aspects of the business get someone’s full attention.  Now, you many not have the cash flow to make payroll for a dream team professional staff.  Furthermore, while finding quality people with the ability to think critically and independently is very difficult to do, delegating the most critical roles in your farming enterprise doesn’t have to be that complicated.  There are trustworthy professionals that would love the opportunity to partner with today’s farmers to improve the situation of both parties involved.  These types of mutually beneficial relationships are the pillars that our cooperative system was founded on.  Keep in mind that a huge part of that trust element is that the people you choose to work with have the expertise to give you the best information available to make the tough decisions you face.  At Co-op, we have some of the brightest and best trained minds in the industry, each with specialized focuses, and we want to be a part of your winning team.  Trust, integrity, and a commitment to excellence are among our core values.  So, the next time you reach for your precision ag specialist, agronomist, or crop scout hat…why not give Co-op a call instead?
 

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