Increase your wheat crop’s yield potential with seed treatments

Oct 14, 2019


It has been said that 70 percent of a wheat crop’s yield potential has already been determined as soon as the seed is in the ground.  Why not give yourself a little extra insurance before planting with a seed treatment? Treating the seed can create an environment that promotes good germination, uniform emergence, and strong stand establishment during one of the most critical phases in the wheat growing season.

Treatments can contain seed fungicides, seed insecticides, and growth regulators. Seed fungicides protect against seed- and soil-borne diseases and early season damping off.  Seed insecticides ward off yield-limiting pests that can threaten early season vigor and plant health.  Growth regulators like Ascend can increase seedling root and shoot development which, in later planting windows, can be extremely beneficial.

Contact your local Co-op agronomy staff for more information. These experts are eager to help you develop the right wheat seed treatment strategy for your farm this fall! 
 

Read More News

Jun 06,2022
 Quality fertilizer application is critical every year, but the spotlight is intense on this field-pass given current input costs. No matter the application system used, factors such as weather, humidity, and field conditions can make quality applications difficult to achieve. However, accurate and precise application can be attained by regularly testing for calibration and uniformity, and machine maintenance
May 16,2022
Based on a Prospective Plantings report released on March 31 from the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) National Agricultural Statistic Service (NASS), Tennessee farmers  farmers intend to plant an estimated 970,000 acres of corn in 2022, 50,000 lower than 2021. U.S. corn growers intend to plant 89.5 million acres for all purposes in 2022, down 4% from 2021 and 1% lower than 2020.
 
May 02,2022
For those not familiar with it, the incredibly innocuous name “plant bug” might illicit a chuckle on first hearing.
“Aren’t all bugs plant bugs?” you may ask. But for fruit, vegetable, and row-crop farmers — cotton producers, in particular — plant bugs are no laughing matter, and their name is synonymous with expensive inputs and lowered yields. Increased numbers of the insect, more specifically, the tarnished plant bug (TPB), are creating big problems within the cotton industry in parts of the Southeastern U.S.