Scales Take Guesswork Out of Livestock Management

Nov 09, 2020


Livestock management involves many important duties, and having an accurate weight on these animals is one of them. Therefore, it’s recommended that livestock producers utilize scales. As our friends at Tru-Test, one of Co-op’s scale manufacturing partners, say, “You can’t manage what you can’t measure!”

Regularly weighing livestock can help you to:

• Ensure animals are continually gaining weight
• Identify good performers that might require less feed
• Identify poor performers that may require medical treatment
• Ensure livestock are sold at the optimum weight grade
• Minimize medical treatment dosage waste

Today’s high-tech scales can also be useful in record-keeping.  Several of the scale indicators that you can purchase along with your package are capable of storing records that can be downloaded to your personal computer at a later date.  This option is appealing to anyone who keeps up with animal weights from birth to sale.
For help with selecting the right scale package for your operation, visit with the livestock professionals at your local Co-op.
 
 

Read More News

Sep 26,2022
Dry, summer conditions will soon be replaced by mud season. For many horse owners, keeping their pastures and barn area clean during this time may seem like an impossible task, but it is important to plan ahead to create a dry environment for your horses to live in throughout the fall and winter months.
 
Sep 19,2022
When posed the question of which industry is the most dangerous, most Americans would not put farming near the top of the list. However, agriculture is an incredibly complex industry that presents many challenges for workers, including machinery accidents, hot and strenuous working conditions, animal unpredictability, chemical and pesticide safety concerns, and more. For these reasons, the agriculture sector is considered the most dangerous in the country, according to last year’s report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
 
Sep 12,2022
As colder weather approaches, rodents will be looking for a warm place to find food and build a nest. Unfortunately, for many farmers, that refuge will be their barn or shed.