Being essential requires staying safe

Apr 06, 2020


Agriculture has been deemed an essential business by the federal and state government. That isn’t news to us. We know that the rest of the country cannot operate without access to safe and healthy food and clothes.

However, while essential workers are out working the fields, visiting the local Co-op and stopping for diesel, they can be exposed to the coronavirus without even knowing it. During this time, it is vitally important to stay safe while on the job.
 
  1. Follow the rules
First, you’ve heard it over and over for weeks, but we’re saying it again: wash your hands often! Hand sanitizer is a nice supplement, but you should rely on hand washing first. Also, you can’t over-wash right now. Even if your hands are freshly washed, try to avoid touching your eyes, mouth, and nose.

Second, stay at home unless you’re leaving for work, doctor’s visits, or groceries. When you must be out, practice social distancing.
Third, if you become sick, stay home and isolate yourself as much as possible from your family members.
 
  1. Take extra precautions at home
Before you enter the house, take your shoes off outside and sanitize them. Change your clothes quickly and shower. Anything that has had contact with the outside world needs to be washed and sanitized. As much as possible, avoid placing your grocery bags on the counter and sanitize items before putting them away. Being overly cautious right now can keep those are high risk safe, and the virus out of your home.
 
  1. Stay at home when not at work
It is so easy when you’re an essential worker to forget that the rest of the world is on lock down. Practice lock-down mentality anyway. Go to work, go home. Don’t visit friends, don’t visit neighbors, and don’t hang out at the Co-op. Practice social distancing when you’re out by staying six feet away from everyone.
 
We are part of an essential industry, and our neighbors are counting on us. You keep farming and Co-op will continue to provide you with the seed, feed, and fertilizer, and supplies you need. As long as we keep ourselves and each other safe, we can get through this together.
 
 

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