Animal Friendly Grants Help Shelters and Pet Owners

Apr 19, 2021


Tennessee specialty license plates sales help pet owners have access to low-cost spay and neutering services. Funds from the Animal Friendly - Spay and Neuter Saves Lives license plates go to Animal Friendly Grants, a program administered by the Tennessee Department of Agriculture’s (TDA) Animal Health Division.
 
“Pet owners who want to prevent their dogs or cats from having more litters can do that more affordably with these grants,” State Veterinarian Dr. Samantha Beaty said. “Spaying and neutering pets will go a long way in reducing overpopulation in shelters, and it can help protect against some health problems for your pet.”
 
Animal Friendly Grants are available to government shelters or 501c3s in Tennessee that provide low-cost spay and neuter services. Grant awards are based on the number of animals the organization serves and how many counties are reached. Shelters and organizations that serve distressed counties are prioritized.
 
The reimbursement grants are for spay and neuter procedures only and do not cover other types of services or overhead expenses. The procedure must be performed by a clinic in Tennessee with a veterinarian who is licensed in Tennessee. The application period for grants is open until May 14, 2021.
 
Qualified organizations that are interested in the grant should email animal.friendlygrants@tn.gov or call 615-837-5002 to request an application.
 
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