Take the Fight to Weeds This Fall

Nov 04, 2019


Did you know fall is an excellent time for weed control?

Weeds like buttercup, chickweed, henbit, deadnettle, and musk thistle germinate in the fall and remain dormant in a rosette stage until temperatures start to warm up in the spring. Applying herbicide now is ideal since the seeds are not well established. Once the weeds reach their flowering stage, control is much more difficult.

Fall applications don’t have to be complex. For effective control, use 2,4-D ester at 2-3 pints per acre. For contact and residual control, use 1½ pints of GrazonNext® per acre. Apply herbicides with a minimum of 20 gallons of water per acre.

For optimum results, consider adding adjuvants to your weed control. We recommend WinField® United’s Powerlock®, a time-saving premix which provides the combined benefits of Preference® and Interlock®, offering improved deposition, enhanced canopy penetration, and reduction of spray drift in one convenient formula. Use 8 ounces per acre.

For best results, apply when daytime temperatures have reached the mid-50s for three consecutive days.
Visit your local Co-op for all of your fall spraying needs.
 
 

Read More News

May 08, 2024
Heavy rains fell as more than 20 Co-op operators and fertilizer managers filed into the conference room at First Farmers Cooperative’s (FFC) Lexington location for their third annual Fertilizer Truck Rodeo, a day of education for the Co-op’s fertilizer applicators to enhance their skills to better serve the farmers of West Tennessee.
 
Apr 02, 2024
Advanced research and tried-and-true techniques will be on display throughout the year and across the state during the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) in-person and online field days in 2024. Most events are hosted at UT AgResearch and Education Centers throughout the state and feature UTIA researchers and Extension specialists as expert speakers.
Dec 08, 2023
As this December issue of The Cooperator goes to print, the 2023 harvest season is drawing to a close. Although the final report from the United States Department of Agriculture wasn't available by press time, one farmer is reporting one of his best harvests to date.