Dog Vaccination Schedule for Puppy’s First Year

Apr 12, 2021


Your new puppy needs a series of vaccinations in the first year of life to protect him from many dangerous diseases as his puppy immune system develops. Different veterinarians recommend slightly different vaccination schedules and vaccines according to the specific dog’s risk factors.
Your vet can be more specific about the vaccination needs based on your individual dog, the particular region of the country in which you live, and your individual circumstances. In general, however, the first-year vaccination schedule for puppies usually resembles the schedule in the table here.
Puppy Vaccination Schedule
Puppy’s Age Recommended Vaccinations Optional Vaccinations
6 to 8 weeks Distemper, measles, parainfluenza Bordatella
10 to 12 weeks DHPP (vaccines for distemper, adenovirus [hepatitis],
parainfluenza, and parvovirus)
Coronavirus, Leptospirosis, Bordatella, Lyme disease
12 to 24 weeks Rabies None
14 to 16 weeks DHPP Coronavirus, Lyme disease, Leptospirosis
12 to 16 months Rabies, DHPP Coronavirus, Leptospirosis, Boradetella, Lyme disease
Every 1 to 2 years DHPP Coronavirus, Leptospirosis, Bordetella, Lyme disease
Every 1 to 3 years Rabies (as required by law) None
 
Your local Co-op carries a wide variety of dog vaccines and is willing to help you find out what will work best for your doggie. Find the Co-op nearest you here.
For more content like this, check out to April issues of the Cooperator.
 

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