vaccination schedules and vaccines may vary slightly according to  the specific dog’s risk factors.

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Dog Vaccination Schedule for a Puppy’s First Year

Apr 13, 2020


Your new puppy definitely needs a series of vaccinations in the first year of life for protection from many dangerous diseases as its doggy immune system develops. Veterinarian recommendations for vaccination schedules and vaccines may vary slightly according to  the specific dog’s risk factors.

Your vet can be more specific about the vaccination needs based on your individual dog, the particular region of the country in which you live, and your individual circumstances. In general, however, the first-year vaccination schedule for puppies usually resembles the schedule listed below.

Suggested Puppy Vaccination Schedule:

 
Weeks Old: Vaccines Needed:
6 weeks Vaccine for Distemper, Adenovirus, Parainfluenza, Parvovirus
9 weeks Vaccine for Distemper, Adenovirus,  Parainfluenza, Parvovirus, Leptospirosis
12 weeks Vaccine for Distemper, Adenovirus, Parainfluenza, Parvovirus, Leptospirosis, Rabies vaccine as required by Federal law


Note:  Some puppies may also need vaccinations for Coronavirus, Lyme’s Disease, and Bordetella. A veterinarian can help decide if these vaccines are appropriate for your puppy.  Additionally, veterinarians can provide guidance about the appropriateness of lepto vaccines in some special circumstances.
 
Yearly Vaccination Schedule for Adult Dogs:
Distemper, Adenovirus, Parainfluenza, Parvovirus, Leptospirosis
Rabies (yearly or every three years depending upon vaccine type and local regulations)
 
Note:  Veterinarians may also recommend Bordetella, Lyme’s Disease, and Coronavirus vaccines depending up on geographical location and lifestyle of the dog.

For more information on what the series of vaccinations in the first year of life your puppy needs contact your local veterinarian. 
 

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