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January

  1. Strip-graze any remaining stockpiled tall fescue. Overgraze fields to be seeded with red or white clover in February.
  2. Scout fields for broadleaf weeds. Decide which fields should be sprayed and which ones should be seeded with clovers.
  3. Soil-test fields to determine lime and fertilizer requirements.
  4. Lime fields as needed, if they were not limited in the fall, according to soil-test results.
 
 

February

  1. Scout fields for broad leaf weeds. Spray 2, 4-D to kill buttercup, thistle and other weeds if daytime temperatures reach 60°F for three days.
  2. Cattle: In fields that do not need to be sprayed, broadcast 2 lbs. white clover and 4 lbs. red clover per acre over tall fescue or orchardgrass fields. Horse: In fields that do not need to be sprayed, broadcast 2 lb white clover per acre over tall fescue and orchardgrass fields. Note: Do not spray for broadleaf weeds and seed clovers in the same field.
  3. Cattle: Feed Mg mineral to prevent grass tetany.
  4. Apply paraquat to dormant bermudagrass to kill annual weeds, if needed. Any winter annuals will be killed as well.
 
 

March

  1. Apply phosphorous and potassium, based on soil tests, to cool-season grass pastures and hay fields with clovers.
  2. Apply 60-80 lbs. of actual nitrogen to cool-season grass pastures and hayfields that do not contain clovers.
  3. Cattle: Feed Mg mineral to prevent grass tetany. Note: Proper phospherous fertilization enhances forage magnesium uptake and helps to lower the grass tetany risk.
  4. Finish red and white clover plantings. Use drill this month instead of broadcasting.
  5. Spray fields for broadleaf weeds as needed.
  6. Cross fence tall fescue pastures to begin rotational grazing.
  7. Graze winter annual pastures.
  8. Continue to feed hay if pasture growth is slow.
 
 

April

  1. Cattle: Continue to feed Mg mineral.
  2. Check and service hay-harvesting equipment in preparation for harvest.
  3. Fertilize cool-season grasses if you have not already done so.
  4. Rotationally graze pastures to maintain clovers. Begin grazing when grass is 8-10 inches tall, and remove animals when grass is down to 3 inches.
  5. Continue to graze winter annual pastures.
  6. Be alert for the possibility of bloat, especially in fields having high legume populations.
 
 

May

  1. Harvest hay from tall fescue, orchardgrass or other cool-season grass fields.
  2. Apply 60 lbs. of actual nitrogen per acre, to pure cool-season grass fields if a second hay harvest is expected.
  3. Apply nitrogen, phosphate and potash to bermudagrass pastures and hay fields based on soil-test results. Note: Bermudagrass growth is often greatest in the early part of the growing season. Adjust nitrogen and potash rates to meet grazing and hay demands.
  4. For bermudagrass pasture, apply 60 lbs. of actual nitrogen as growth begins and another 60 lbs. later in the summer when moisture is adequate.
  5. Seed summer annuals for hay or grazing.
  6. If pasture growth exceeds what animals can utilize, harvest the excess as hay.
  7. Spring bermudagrass fields.
  8. Forage-test cut hay to determine nutritional value.
 
 

June

  1. Harvest bermudagrass and summer annual fields on 30-day intervals to capture both yield and quality.
  2. For bermudagrass hay apply 60-100 lbs. of actual nitrogen per acre to bermudagrass after each harvest.
  3. Take second cutting of tall fescue and orchardgrass hay fields.
  4. Clip undergrazed mature pastures to promote new growth.
  5. Soil test any fields to be seeded this fall.
  6. Forage test any hay cut this month to determine nutritional value.
  7. If needed, seed any remaining fields with summer annuals.
  8. If high nitrates are suspected due to drought, have nitrate levels tested.
 
 

July

  1. Harvest summer annual when 30 to 40 inches tall.
  2. Harvest bermudagrass hay on 30-day intervals. Apply 60-100 lbs. of actual nitrogen after each harvest.
  3. Be aware of the potential for high nitrate levels in forage due to drought.
  4. Remove animals from cool-season pastures before overgrazing occurs.
  5. Continue to prepare for seeding new permanent pastures or hay fields.
  6. Put hay under a hay tarp or in a barn to minimize storage losses.Note: Do not allow hay stored outside to touch the ground. More loss is due to soil contact than due to water.
  7. Forage test any hay crops cut this month to determine nutritional value. If high nitrates are suspected due to drought, have nitrates tested.
 
 

August

  1. Select fields of tall fescue that will be stockpiled. Clip or graze late in month to remove old growth.
  2. Soil-test fescue fields to be stockpiled.
  3. Inventory hay supplies to determine the need for purchased hay.
  4. Forage-test any hay crops cut this month to determine nutritional value. If high nitrates are suspected due to drought, have nitrates tested.
 
 

September

  1. After tall fescue fields have begun to grow, apply 60 to 80 lbs. of actual nitrogen per acre for stockpiling.
  2. Apply lime, phosphate and potash for cool-season grasses according to soil test results.
  3. Fertilize and lime newly seeded or overseeded hay fields according to soil test results.
  4. Seed tall fescue and orchardgrass fields. Broadcast clover at the same time if needed.
  5. Plant red or white clover in old fescue or orchardgrass fields as needed.
  6. Seed winter annual pastures if fall grazing is expected.
  7. Do not harvest bermudagrass past middle of the month.
  8. Apply 30 to 60 lbs. per acre phosphate and potash to bermudagrass fields to help cold tolerance or as recommended by soil test.
  9. Cattle: To prevent prussic acid poisoning do not graze sorghum, sudangrass or sorghum x sudangrass after killing frost.
  10. Inventory hay supplies to determine the need for purchased hay.
  11. Put hay under a hay tarp or in a barn to minimize storage losses. If stored outside, do not allow hay to touch the ground.
 
 

October

  1. Overseed bermudagrass pastures with winter annuals for late winter/spring grazing.
  2. Cattle: Beware of grazing sorghum, sudangrass or sorghum x sudangrass hybrids due to the potential for prussic acid poisoning.
  3. Forage test any hay that has not been tested.
  4. Soil test fields that have not been tested within the last two years.
  5. Apply any needed lime to raise soil pH to recommended levels.
  6. Plant red or white clovers in fescue or orchardgrass fields.
 
 

November

  1. Strip-graze stockpiled tall fescue
  2. Scout fields for broadleaf weeds. Spray 2, 4-D to kill buttercup, thistle and other weeds if daytime temperatures reach 60°F for three days.
 
 

December

  1. Feed hay in rings or other type of feeder.
  2. Feed hay stored outside before hay stored under cover.
  3. Overgraze fields that will be seeded with clovers in February
  4. Scout fields for broadleaf weeds. Spray 2,4-D to kill buttercup, thistle and other weeds if daytime temperatures reach 60°F for three days.
 
 
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