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Targeting hunger

Third annual fundraising event for sporting clay enthusiasts raised funds for 215,000 meals
Story by Allison Parker, photos by Allison Parker and Glen Liford 11/17/2017

 

Felicia Brown of First Farmers Bank in Columbia was one of a record 320 shooters from across the midstate who participated in the Third Annual Shooting Hunger Sporting Clays Fun Shoot on Sept. 28 at Nashville Gun Club. The event helped raise funds that will provide nearly 215,000 meals for Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee.
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It can be difficult to process that one out of seven Tennesseans does not know where their next meal will come from. Statistics like these motivated representatives from Tennessee Farmers Cooperative, the Tennessee Farm Bureau Federation, and Farm Credit Mid-America to find a way for the agriculture industry to help feed the hungry. Thus, the Shooting Hunger Sporting Clay Fun Shoot was launched in 2015, and the fundraising initiative has been working to provide meals to hungry Tennesseans ever since.

The third installment of the popular event benefiting Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee was held Sept. 28 at the Nashville Gun Club. On a picture-perfect day, a record attendance of nearly 320 shooters helped raise approximately 215,000 meals for hungry Tennesseans.

Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee relies on donations and fundraisers such as the Sporting Clays Fun Shoot to help fulfill their mission of serving hungry families through partner agencies in Middle and West Tennessee. Second Harvest has been serving hungry families through 490 partner agencies in a 46-county area since 1978. Today, the organization prides itself on being one of the country’s largest food banks and food distribution centers nationwide. Out of every dollar donated to Second Harvest, 96 cents is used to feed the hungry. Last year, Second Harvest distributed more than 30 million pounds of food, the equivalent of more than 25 million meals to hungry children, families, and senior citizens in Tennessee.

“Tennessee agriculture is a close-knit community and we are committed to pulling in the same direction to put a stop to food insecurity.” says Ryan King, marketing and events coordinator for Tennessee Farmers Cooperative. “A number of Co-op leaders and employees from across Tennessee came to the event to show their support for ending hunger in our state. It really makes me proud to say we are taking a stand and the Co-op system is one of those on the leading edge of the efforts.”

At this year’s Shooting Hunger, participants were divided into morning and afternoon sessions. The competition attracted more than 50 five-member teams who tested their target-shooting techniques on unique stations throughout the course. Sporting clays events like this are designed to simulate the unpredictability of hunting live birds in the field rather than shooting skeet from standardized distance and angles.

The morning session’s winning team was ServPro of Montgomery County with a score of 219. Each team member took home their very own 26-quart Yeti cooler. The top shooter for the morning was Billy Wall from ServPro of Montgomery County with a score of 48 out of 50.

Next year’s Shooting for Hunger event at the Nashville Gun Club is a date to be determined in September, and on June 7 at the Carroll County Shooting Sports Park. For more information on how to get involved or register, please visit www.tnfarmbureau.org/shootinghunger or the Shooting Hunger Facebook page.

 
 
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This document copyright © 2017 by Tennessee Farmers Cooperative. All rights reserved. Legal Notice